Why ClassPass Wasn’t Right For Me

Why ClassPass Wasn’t Right For Me

Has ClassPass swept into your city yet? If you don’t know the name already, just wait. ClassPass is next in line to the smart phone assisted services-on-demand throne, and it’s making fitness an all you can eat buffet in 32 cities across the nation so far. The basic gist of the service is that, for $80/month in most markets, you can have access to fitness classes at countless gyms in your area. We aren’t talking about second string options that no one wants to take either–ClassPass serves up barre, spinning, hot yoga, you get the idea, at the trendiest spots in your town.  As a secret admirer of/aspirer to all things LuluLemon, I was salivating as soon as I opened the app, even if I should know better.

(Sidebar Hatters: I read a theory the other day that most multi, multi, million dollar tech start ups simply connect users to services that already exist with more ease: think Uber, Seamless, and Instacart. I can’t shake it, or shake how unnecessary a lot of these services seem, and I’ll definitely be taking a more in depth look at the impact of these ubiquitous apps on your wallet later.  But for now, back to ClassPass.)

On the surface, ClassPass seems like a bargain. I took a gander through their Seattle offerings, and a membership at any one of the gyms ClassPass grants access to would run you at least $100 a month.  The only catch to ClassPass’s $80 deal is that you can only visit the same studio three times in a month; if there’s a hot yoga studio you love by your apartment, you can’t use ClassPass to turn a $120 membership into an $80 plan and visit the studio every day.  Gyms get to fill empty class spaces, ClassPass provides a fitness service without any of the hassles of running a brick and mortar fitness center, and you get to take classes to your heart’s content.  Win/win/win, right?

Unfortunately not for me.  And I do mean unfortunately; this isn’t about to morph into a snappy putdown of what ClassPass does.

I used the power of asking on Twitter to get access to a two week free ClassPass trial, and after five days in, I’ve ended the trial early.

I didn’t do it for any dramatic reason.  I attended one class, and I enjoyed it (though I did have trouble jumping into a studio setting with habitual practitioners as someone who hasn’t worked out in a few months.)  I think the service is well-designed, and if I put a great enough value on fitness classes in particular, I’d cough over the $80 at the end of my trial to keep the service going.

What I realized this week, though, as I scheduled my classes after work and found myself dreading them, as I wished I could just go for a run instead of worrying about parking at a studio, as I wondered what I would wear in a more upscale workout setting…was that ClassPass wasn’t bringing me any joy. The purpose of this blog is to explore the things in life that make us really want to stand up and sing and to have the financial freedom to use our brief stint of time on Earth the way that we want to.

Every time I decide to save instead of to spend, I add freedom and security to my life; why would I trade those things for anything less than absolutely, knock you off of your feet, joy?  ClassPass didn’t bring me that joy.

There’s value to working out, absolutely, but when I can do it for free (or as close to it as anything in life is), I’m not going to risk the chance that I’ll like ClassPass enough to settle for trading $80 a month for it.  The trial was interesting, but it seemed like if I stayed any longer, I’d talk myself into accepting a monthly debit for something that was useful, sure, but not worth my freedom. Maybe some of you with more self-restraint could do better, but what I lack in self-control, I like to think I make up for in self-awareness.

And that was all there was to it.  ClassPass seems like a fantastic service to meet the needs of folks who adore fitness classes and want to jump up and down at the chance to sample the different options their city offers.  I’m not that person (as much as I wish I were), so I’m not trading my freedom for what ClassPass is selling.  If you’re currently in a gym membership or another automated monthly debit for recreation system, I’d ask you to think deeply about how much joy the service brings you and whether you’re giving yourself a fair trade.  Do you keep your gym membership because you absolutely value what you get from it on par with the money you trade for it, or do you keep it out of unexamined habit?  Is it worth your freedom?

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